CREDIT: Credit is based on semester units and follows the Carnegie Unit. A unit of credit represents fifteen hours of class time.

COURSE NUMBERING

CURR111a Teachers as Learners (1)

Candidates examine their own experiences as learners and explore how those experiences affect their beliefs as teachers. Candidates focus on the complexity of teaching and meeting the needs of a variety of learners, with an emphasis on English Language Learners. Candidates are introduced to the California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs), which provide the guide for teacher expectations. Candidates examine the professional, legal, and ethical obligations of being an educator.

CURR112 Understanding the Physiology of Learning (1)

Candidates will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of the learning and thinking process. Candidates will explore the following topics: 1) influences that foster or inhibit learning; 2) current brain research and other theories which help us understand the learning process, typical and atypical development; 3) current research and practice on factors affecting students’ language acquisition; 4) individual differences that affect learning 5) strategies for including English Learners in mainstream curriculum.

CURR113 Creating a Learning Community (1)

Candidates focus on classroom management and environment, and the importance of establishing a physically, socially, and emotionally safe environment. Emphasis is also placed on the need for a climate of caring, respect, and fairness for all students. Candidates explore techniques that foster learning and use motivation as a key to discipline. The course addresses the influence of environment and instruction on the learning community. Professional, legal, and ethical issues related to meeting the needs of all learners are explored.

CURR118A Foundations for Teaching Career and Technical Education (1)

Candidates are introduced to the essential themes, concepts, and skills related to teaching career and technical education. Candidates focus on the Standards for Career Ready Practices, the Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards (Anchor and Pathway Standards), and their connection to the CA state adopted standards. Other aspects covered are an historical perspective of CTE Education, 21st Century Learning, and partnerships with businesses and the community to enhance instruction. Candidates provide a portfolio of evidence to document how they are meeting the standards.

CURR119 Access for All Students (1)

This course provides candidates with an introduction to evaluation, modification, design, and implementation of interventions, accommodations, and differentiation that will provide access to content for all learners. Special consideration is directed to the needs of English Language Learners and students with special needs.

CURR120 Preparing to Teach Reading/Language Arts (1)

This course provides pre-service teachers with an introduction to the developmental stages of literacy development. Candidates are provided explicit instruction in developing a motivating, literacy rich environment which integrates reading, writing, listening, and speaking for a full range of learners (including struggling readers, students with special needs, English Learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners). The role of read-alouds in literacy development is emphasized. Candidates explore the roles cultural and parental influences play in language development. The course includes the use of assessments to inform instruction for literacy development. Accommodations and modifications to meet the needs of all students, particularly ELs, will be provided throughout the course.

CURR122 Curriculum, Instruction & Assessment in General Education (1)

Candidates are introduced to the cyclical process of curricular planning, teaching, assessing, and analyzing student work to guide instruction for both short-term and long-term instructional goals. Candidates learn and practice developing the elements of effective lesson design (learning objectives, anticipatory set, instruction, progress monitoring, closure, and assessment) utilizing CA Academic Content Standards (CA state adopted standards, Next Generation Science Standards) and the standards for career readiness. Candidates gain an understanding of how to monitor student progress and become familiar with a variety of assessment tools, including rubrics. Issues of diversity and teaching English Learners and students with special needs are addressed as they relate to curriculum planning, instruction, and assessment practices.

CURR220 Classroom Management & Discipline (2)

Candidates learn to create a positive learning environment that is physically, emotionally, and socially safe which recognizes the students’ needs to participate and belong. Candidates are introduced to a variety of approaches to classroom management; and, analyze and refine classoom management plans that focus on creating a climate of caring, respect, and fairness. Furthermore, candidates learn specific strategies for involving parents in the educational process and learn to respond to issues in a culturally sensitive manner.

CURR221 Health & Safety Curriculum & Instruction (1)

Candidates focus on the role of the teacher in fostering student health literacy. This course is designed to prepare educators to ensure equity and excellence for all students in a culturally diverse, technologically complex, and global community. Teachers will identify the necessary components of implementing effective health and safety education curriculum. An emphasis is placed on student access and participation in order for students to reach their full potential in the subject of health education.

CURR231 Math Curriculum & Instruction (2)

Candidates learn a variety of strategies, instructional approaches and assessment procedures to increase their ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and regularly assess mathematics competencies. Candidates demonstrate the ability to understand and teach the progression of the state adopted content standards for all students in mathematics.

CURR232 Beginning Reading Curriculum & Instruction (2)

This course provides candidates with a comprehensive, research-based curriculum addressing the foundational, theoretical, and practical aspects of teaching reading, writing, speaking, and listening to the full range of learners (including struggling readers, students with special needs, English Learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners). Candidates are provided explicit instruction in beginning reading skills, phonemic awareness, phonics, word analysis, fluency, vocabulary development, and reading comprehension. A variety of strategies, instructional approaches and assessment procedures are emphasized in order to ensure the candidate’s ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and regularly assess the elements of beginning reading that are aligned with the CA state adopted standards. Candidates understand and apply a variety of assessment practices to guide instruction.

CURR234 Building Academic Language (1)

This course provides candidates with a comprehensive research-based curriculum addressing the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching literacy. Candidates will develop an understanding of how proficiency in academic language (the language of literacy and books, tests, formal writing, and academic discourse) is related to achievement in reading, writing, speaking, and listening for a full range of learners (e.g. struggling readers, students with special needs, English Learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners). This course also stresses the relationship between independent pupil reading of complex text and the improvement of reading in a range of contexts. A variety of strategies, instructional approaches, and assessment procedures are emphasized in order to ensure the candidate’s ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and regularly assess the elements of reading, writing, speaking, and listening as outlined in the CA state adopted standards.

CURR240 Instructional Strategies for Secondary Students (1)

Candidates focus on the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching. Candidates explore and practice a variety of techniques and strategies for effective instruction, including critical thinking skills, and problem based learning. Instructional approaches and assessment procedures are emphasized in order to ensure the candidate’s ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and assess their lessons’ effectiveness based on student learning. This is the first course in a two-course series and provides general content instruction prior to candidates taking CURR245 Content Specific Instruction or CURR246 Industry Specific Instruction.

CURR241 Adolescent Development (1)

Candidates explore theories, research, principles, and concepts in areas of cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, and physical development of adolescents. Candidates examine social structures and influences that promote or hinder development and learning for diverse populations. Additionally, candidates are introduced to the Standards for Career Ready Practices and explore ways to help students make connections to life beyond high school and post secondary and career choices.

CURR246 Industry Sector Content Instruction (1)

Candidates focus on coursework and assignments emphasizing theoretical and practical aspects of teaching the candidate’s Industry Sector. Candidates explore and practice a variety of techniques and strategies for planning effective instruction in their pathway. Instructional approaches and assessment procedures are emphasized in order to ensure the candidate’s ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and assess their lessons’ effectiveness based on student learning. Candidates refer to the Standards for Career Ready Practices, and the California Career Technical Education Model Curriculum Standards (Anchor and Pathway).

CURR251 Teaching Culturally & Linguistically Diverse Students (1)

Candidates study and discuss the historical and cultural traditions of cultural and ethnic groups in California society. Candidates examine effective ways to include cultural traditions and community values and resources in the instructional program of a classroom and school environment. Candidates explore how to eliminate bias in order to create an equitable classroom community that contributes to the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual safety of all students.

CURR252 Instructional Strategies for English Language Learners (1)

Candidates learn the purposes, goals, and content of the adopted English Language Development standards for the effective teaching and support of English Learners. Candidates learn and apply pedagogical theories, principles, and instructional practices for comprehensive instruction of English Learners. Candidates learn how to develop, deliver, integrate, and regularly assess an instructional program that facilitates English language acquisition and development of academic language by effectively using materials, methods, and strategies so that students acquire listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English. Candidates learn how to differentiate instruction based upon their students’ primary language and proficiency levels in English, as well as, consider the students’ culture, level of acculturation, and prior schooling. Candidates learn about state and federal requirements for the placement and instruction of English Learners, and ethical obligations for teaching English Learners.

CURR281 & 282 Support Supervision: CTE (1-2)

Candidates work 1:1 with a Support Supervisor and learn how to meld course content into their teaching practice. Candidates’ growth and progress is measured in meeting the California standards for the Teaching Profession (CSTP’s). Candidates receive formative and summative feedback which guides a reflective learning process and which is documented on the Individual Learning Plan and/or supervisory notes. Support Supervisors facilitate this course based on each candidate’s developmental level and needs.

  • CURR281 (1) – First Semester of Initial Preparation Program
  • CURR282 (1) - Second Semester of Initial Preparation Program
CURR321 Research Methods and Application (3)

The purpose of the Research Methods and Application course is to expose candidates to the role of various types of research literature and learn to be informed consumers of research. Topics in this course that help candidates deepen understanding of techniques of research design include, but are not limited to, empirical research constructs, review of evaluation research and policy analysis, how to read quantitative and qualitative research reports, descriptive and inferential statistics, and basic understandings of the scientific method (problem, hypothesis, data collection, and data analysis). Candidates develop a research proposal in this course with essential elements of effective research methodologies.

CURR341 Preparing Students for the 21st Century (3)

Exploration of the context of 21st century learning environments are researched, observed, and discussed. The recent reforms and innovations in P-12 education, especially focusing on college and career readiness initiatives and implications to schools, are examined. Design Thinking is used to challenge candidates to reimagine solutions to complex educational issues and invent innovative models of schools and classrooms. What would a truly innovative, reform oriented, 21st century classroom look like? What are the implications to teachers who need to prepare students to be engaged in civics and global awareness? These issues are among the topics and questions considered in this course.

CURR343 Curriculum for the 21st Century (3)

Candidates extend their understanding of how to transition from conventional teaching practices to identifying and practicing strategies necessary to design 21st century learning environments. Application of Design Thinking for the development of integrated, real-life, inquiry based Project Based Learning units provide the major focus of the course. Candidates consider topics such as authentic assessment and how to embed rigor, relevance, reflection and relationships to enhance P – 12 students’ learning. Candidates are challenged to reflect on the critical need to reinvent how TK-12 students are prepared for their futures.

CURR344 Lesson Study (2)

This course focuses on the sequence of stages teachers attend to in an instructional cycle, or learning cycle, which helps students develop a full understanding of a lesson concept. Co-teaching, co-planning, and reflecting deeply on students’ evidence of learning within a lesson provides opportunities for combining theory and components of effective lesson design.

CURR345 Teacher Action Research (3)

The purpose of the Teacher Action Research course is to help candidates understand a research that is defined to be any effort towards reflective and disciplined inquiry. Course content includes learning the processes of action research, how to conduct action research, and that research can involve a wide array of methods derived from both the quantitative and qualitative domains. The focus of the action research project will be defined by the candidate and will follow guidelines related to the teaching and learning process, be within an appropriate scope of influence, and with a purpose of initiating action to understand or solve a problem.

CURR346 Teacher Leader Lab (3)

This course focuses on preparing teacher leaders who are ready to transform school culture. Development of the understanding of how to implement group processes to make decisions, manage conflict, and promote meaningful change are included among the topics considered as participants learn the traits of effective coaching and practice to hone their skills. The course also covers the theory and practice that underpins the design of effective learning opportunities for adult learners.

CURR347 Theory of Teacher Leadership (1)

The Theory of Teacher Leadership course is designed to explore how social, cultural, and political systems influence education. The theories of social, human, and physical capital as well as cognitive and self theories will be explored with the goal to understand how the actions of a teacher-leader may function to inspire, motivate, and reform educational practice.

CURR384 Writing the Literature Review (2)

Candidates will participate in conversations with faculty, experts, and colleagues on a variety of topics related to the development of a literature review. Specific attention will be paid to topic development, keyword searches, adequate sources, writing style, development of an outline, and correct citing of research in accordance to the American Psychological Association (APA).

CURR385 Masters Project in Educational Inquiry (4)

This is the capstone course for the Master’s degree. As such, candidates will work with their advisor to design and execute a project that demonstrates inquiry, incorporates content from coursework, contributes to the body of knowledge for their focus topic, and makes a real world difference to school, kids, and/or community. The project must be suitable for publication and presentation.

EADM270 Public Schools in a Democratic Society (2)

The purpose of this course is to introduce administrative candidates to the complexities involved in public schooling within a democracy including the relationship of schools to the school community, governmental entities, and community agencies. The course includes discussion and analysis of foundational issues and theories and their relationship to professional practices in schools. The course addresses developing accommodations and modifications to meet the needs of all students, particularly EL and students with disabilities.

EADM271 The Principalship (1)

The purpose of this course is to prepare candidates for school administration. The focus of this course will be on the school principal. Candidates will understand the principal’s role in effective school development. Examination of issues related to site administration will be explored including, but not limited to: building relationships with stakeholders, effective communication, building trust, leadership processes, managing change, organization, time management, personal/professional balance, and the nature of instructional leadership. Accommodations and modifications to meet the needs of all students, particularly EL and students with disabilities will be provided throughout the course.

EADM272 Climate Development, School Culture & Motivation (2)

The purpose of this course is to introduce administrative candidates to important concepts, theories, and practices of educational leadership. Course will review leadership theory, contemporary conceptions of effective leadership, leadership style, and change effort. Candidates will participate in problem-based learning, case study analysis, discussion, and other activities and projects.

EADM273 Supervision of Instruction (1)

This course is designed to develop knowledge, skills related to personnel supervision and management for educators while they prepare to be effective school administrators.

EADM274 School Law (2)

The purpose of this course is to develop the knowledge and skills regarding legal principles, interpretations, and practice governing federal, state, county, and local school administration practices.

EADM275 Administration of Human Resources (1)

This course is intended to develop knowledge, skills, and abilities in human resources management in the public school setting. This course will focus on the information and competence necessary to manage the day-to-day and long-term human resource issues typically experienced by administrators at the school site and district office.

EADM276 Equity & Access (1)

The purpose of this course is to provide administrative candidates with an understanding of the diverse communities that comprise a school community and the need to serve all students. Candidates examine and work to recognize their own attitudes and diminish bias regarding race, gender, ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, religion, ability, and socio-economic status and understand the role of the school administrator in promoting equitable access to education. Additionally, candidates will assist others in the examination of their attitudes and biases in an effort to promote the equitable access to education for students.

EADM277 Building Partnerships and Community (1)

The purpose of this course is to introduce and examine the values and concerns of the many diverse communities that constitute a school community. Effective ways to involve various communities in the participation of school life are presented. This course examines contextual issues affecting society and the nature of schooling, programs, and strategies that have increased upward mobility among low income and/or minority youth and special needs students. Strategies to bring diverse constituencies into the education decision-making process are emphasized. Understanding diverse constituencies is the central focus of this course. Learning activities are designed to stimulate critical analysis, problem solving, deductive and inductive reasoning, and scholarly discussion. This course addresses developing accommodations and modifications to meet the needs of all students, particularly EL students and students with disabilities.

EADM284 School Finance & Business Administration (1)

The purpose of this course is to introduce administrative candidates to the economics of education, school finance, and school business administration. Candidates will understand public policy regarding the equitable distribution of resources. This course is designed to develop knowledge, skills, and abilities, related to school finance management for educators while they prepare to be effective school administrators.

EADM286C/D Administrative Fieldwork (6)

Fieldwork provides an authentic experience designed to permit the candidate to become familiar with the roles and functions of a school administrator. Candidates are assigned to a school site 12 days over the course of a school year and serve in the capacity of student administrator at that site.

EADM288 Educational Planning, Delivery, and Assessment (2)

Candidates will develop comprehensive plans that focus on analyzing student data, creating goals, providing professional development, curriculum and student intervention implementation and establishing timelines to promote student learning. This course will provide an overview of the six steps of continuous improvement, an understanding of establishing a site council, creating a school plan, state testing, data analysis and the evaluation process.

EADM290 Culminating Seminar (1)

In this course candidates will develop a portfolio of evidence and reflection based on the integration of coursework and fieldwork to demonstrate their competency of the following California Administrative Performance Expectations (CAPEs):

  1. Development & Implementation of a Shared Vision
  2. Instructional Leadership
  3. Management & Learning Environment
  4. Family & Community Engagement
  5. Ethics & Integrity
  6. External Context & Policy

Upon completion of this course candidates will submit their portfolio for scoring by a team of faculty and supervisors.

EADM385 Masters Project in Education Leadership and School Development (4)

This is the capstone course for the Masters degree. As such, candidates will work with their advisor to design and execute a project that demonstrates an understanding of the role of leadership in school development, incorporates content from coursework, contributes to the body of knowledge for their focus topic, and makes a real world difference to districts, schools, kids, and community. Project must be suitable for publication and presentation.

EADM386 Evidence Based Leadership (4)

Candidates will be prepared for Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of the California Administrative Performance Assessments (CalAPA). In addition, various technology tools, applications, and resources for school leadership will be introduced. Candidates will be taught necessary programs that will support them as they prepare to face the demands of a school site administrator, as well as enable them to address requirements of the CalAPA.

ECED344 Lesson Study (2)
  • This course focuses on the sequence of stages teachers attend to in an instructional cycle, or learning cycle for children aged birth through 8 years. Students develop a full understanding of a lesson concept and collaborate with their peers to develop and teach a lesson. As they reflect deeply on evidence of children’s learning within the lesson, they are given opportunities to redesign critical components and shift their beliefs around effective lesson design.
  • ECED385 Masters Project in Early Education (4)
  • This is the capstone course for the Masters degree. As such, candidates will work with their advisor to design and execute a project that demonstrates inquiry, incorporates content from coursework, contributes to the body of knowledge for their focus topic, and makes a real world difference to school, kids, and/or community. The project must be suitable for publication and presentation.
  • EDUC200A Teaching for Learning 1: Multiple Subject (4)

    The semester one coursework develops candidates’ ability to successfully establish relationships with their students and foster positive interactions with parents and the school community. Creating learning environments that engage all learners (e.g. English learners, students with special needs) requires candidates to implement norms and routines for classroom work and discourse, design effective standards-based lessons with clear learning goals, and use assessment data to inform instruction. In collaboration with TCSJ faculty or master teachers, candidates reflect upon their own teaching in order to improve their understanding of the complexity of instruction and the professional responsibilities of educators.

    EDUC201A-D Support Supervision: Multiple Subjects (1-4)

    Candidates work 1:1 with a Support Supervisor and learn how to meld course content into their teaching practice. Candidates’ growth and progress is measured in meeting the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). Candidates receive formative and summative feedback which guides a reflective learning process and which is documented on the Individual Learning Plan (ILP) and/or supervisory notes. Support Supervisors facilitate this course based on each candidate’s developmental level and needs.

    EDUC201 requires concurrent enrollment for interns in EDUC202.

    EDUC202A-D Practicum: Multiple Subjects (2-8)

    With the support of TCSJ Faculty and site/district-based professionals (mentors, master teachers, coaches, supervisors and colleagues), candidates apply the principles and pedagogy learned in coursework by serving as the “teacher of record” or resident in a local K-12 setting aligned to the credential being sought.

    EDUC202 requires concurrent enrollment for interns in EDUC201.

    EDUC202R Practicum: Semester One-Residents (1)

    With the support of TCSJ Faculty and site/district-based professionals (mentors, master teachers, , coaches, supervisors and colleagues), candidates apply the principles and pedagogy learned in coursework by serving as the “teacher of record” or resident in a local K-12 setting aligned to the credential being sought.

    EDUC210A Teaching for Learning 1: Single Subject (4)

    The semester one coursework develops candidates’ ability to successfully establish relationships with their students and foster positive interactions with parents and the school community. Creating learning environments that engage all learners (e.g. English learners, students with special needs) requires candidates to implement norms and routines for classroom work and discourse, design effective standards-based lessons with clear learning goals, and use assessment data to inform instruction. In collaboration with TCSJ faculty, candidates reflect upon their own teaching in order to improve their understanding of the complexity of instruction and the professional responsibilities of educators.

    EDUC211A-D Support Supervision: Single Subject (1-4)

    Candidates work 1:1 with a Support Supervisor and learn how to meld course content into their teaching practice. Candidates’ growth and progress is measured in meeting the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs) Candidates receive formative and summative feedback which guides a reflective learning process and which is documented on the Individual Learning Plan (ILP) and/or supervisory notes. Support Supervisors facilitate this course based on each candidate’s developmental level and needs.

    EDUC211 requires concurrent enrollment for interns in EDUC212.

    EDUC212A-D Practicum: Single Subject (2-8)

    With the support of TCSJ Faculty and site/district-based professionals (mentors, master teachers, coaches, supervisors and colleagues), candidates apply the principles and pedagogy learned in coursework by serving as the “teacher of record” or resident in a local K-12 setting aligned to the credential being sought.

    EDUC212 requires concurrent enrollment for interns in EDUC211.

    EDUC220A-L Content Specific Pedagogy (3)

    The Content Specific Pedagogy course prepares candidates as they develop an understanding and working knowledge of the most current state-adopted Standards and Frameworks and the teaching practices and methods to support learning. Candidates will focus on developing and implementing lessons that integrate content, academic literacy and language development skills that engage and support all learners. This course prepares candidates to create learning goals and select 21st Century teaching and learning strategies and approaches that can be adjusted to meet the individual needs of all students in a diverse secondary classroom in California.

    *This course can be used to meet the requirements for adding a single-subject authorization to an existing general education credential. Pre-requisite-Proof of Subject Matter Competence (CSET).

    EDUC221A Planning & Assessing for Learning I (1)

    This course is designed to support candidates as they demonstrate an emerging understanding of the Teaching Performance Expectations and teaching for learning in a standards-based context. With a focus on formative assessment and standards aligned content, candidates will be guided to develop, implement and assess a standards-aligned lesson. An opportunity to record and reflect upon teaching individually and collaboratively will guide the analysis of lesson delivery decisions.

    EDUC221B Planning & Assessing for Learning II (2)

    This course is designed to build upon candidates’ understanding of each of the stages in a teaching and learning cycle (plan, teach, assess, reflect, revise). Candidates will apply principles of Universal Design for Learning as they co-plan, teach, assess and reflect deeply on evidence of learning within a lesson. Throughout this course candidates will explore the purpose and characteristics of a variety of assessments and the elements of effective lesson design to support student learning.

    EDUC221C Planning & Assessing for Learning (2)

    This course is designed to support residents as they demonstrate and build upon understanding of the Teaching Performance Expectations embedded within the stages of a teaching and learning cycle (plan, teach, assess, reflect, revise). Residents apply principles of Universal Design for Learning as they co-plan, co-teach, assess and reflect on evidence of learning with their master teacher and TCSJ instructors. Throughout this course residents explore the purpose and characteristics of a variety of assessments and the elements of effective lesson design to support student learning.

    EDUC222 Teaching for Learning in a Global Society (2)

    In an ever-changing global society, it is imperative for students to develop the knowledge and skills that will support their learning in college, career and civic life. In this course, candidates will learn about specific strategies and current approaches that support college and career readiness. With a focus on the role of technology and 21st Century skills, candidates will develop an understanding of how secondary education practices can provide more equitable access to post-secondary success.

    EDUC223 Examining Belief Systems as a Professional Educator (1)

    This course is designed to provide candidates with an opportunity to explore, self-assess and reflect upon how some of their values, beliefs and implicit or explicit biases shape the learning experiences they provide to their students and how they interact with the larger learning community. With an increased awareness, candidates will be prepared to identify areas for continued growth.

    EDUC230A Foundations of Reading (2)

    This course provides candidates with a research-based curriculum addressing the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching reading to the full range of learners (including struggling readers, students with special needs, English Learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners).

    EDUC230B Foundations of Reading (3)

    This course provides candidates with a research-based curriculum addressing the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching reading to the full range of learners (including struggling readers, students with special needs, English Learners, speakers of non-standard English, and advanced learners).

    EDUC231 Integrated Literacy (3)

    This course supports candidates as they plan for effective instruction, integrating literacy and social studies. Using the most current State adopted ELA/ELD and History/Social Science standards and frameworks as a foundation, candidates will develop and sequence lessons that engage and support all learners using developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and assessments. Candidates learn to create student tasks that are aligned to standards-based learning goals. Additionally, analysis of student work to inform instruction, reflection and communication about student progress will be a focus.

    EDUC231A Integrated Literacy (2)

    This course supports candidates as they plan for effective instruction, integrating literacy and social studies. Using the most current State adopted ELA/ELD and History/Social Science standards and frameworks as a foundation, candidates will develop and sequence lessons that engage and support all learners using developmentally appropriate instructional strategies and assessments. Candidates learn to create student tasks that are aligned to standards-based learning goals. Additionally, analysis of student work to inform instruction, reflection and communication about student progress will be a focus.

    EDUC232 Universal Lesson Design in STEM (3)

    Candidates learn the principles of Universal Lesson Design (UDL) and their role in creating a safe, positive, and equitable learning environment. Coursework emphasizes the application of UDL in the development of integrated science, technology, engineering, and math lessons that incorporate the most current State adopted NGSS and mathematics content standards and frameworks, plus the appropriate use of a Multi-Tiered System of Support (MTSS) to support and engage all learners. Candidates learn a variety of appropriate and innovative ways to use technology as a tool to build student engagement, provide equitable learning opportunities, support digital citizenship, assess learning, and communicate with parents. A culminating project in this course introduces candidates to the basic components of a lesson study, with an emphasis on differentiated learning activities, assessment practices, and analysis of student work.

    EDUC233A Lesson Study (2)

    Candidates build on prior coursework in lesson study, focusing on instructional planning, teaching, and reflective evaluation of student learning. Candidates will use student assessment outcomes as a foundation for designing further instruction that reteaches or builds additional content knowledge and/or skills.

    EL114 Preparing to Teach English Language Learners (1)

    Candidates are introduced and initially prepared to teach English Learners by increasing candidates' knowledge and understanding of second language acquisition, background experiences, home languages, skills and abilities of EL student populations. This course will teach candidates how to apply appropriate pedagogical practices informed by sound theory and research that provide access to the core curriculum and lead to high achievement for all students.

    MIAA310 Teacher Action Research (1)

    MIAA candidates’ Demonstration of Advanced Practices and knowledge regarding the challenges of developing mathematics literacy among California’s diverse student population will be evidenced in their Teacher Action Research through their specialized mathematical knowledge for teaching and thinking, as well as their pedagogical knowledge and practices for teaching mathematics. The candidates will gather evidence from each grade span and focus of each course (see Demonstration of Advanced Practices in each course description) included in the TCSJ MIAA program that will serve as proof of their expertise. Lessons, student work, and reflections will also be included from the candidates’ fieldwork lesson studies. The final research will be submitted in a format ready for publication, supported by a portfolio of evidence from the MIAA fieldwork that is embedded within course expectations as well as the lesson studies. The candidates’ study is presented to program instructors and peers upon completion of the program.

    MIAA320 Mathematical Discourse (1)

    Mathematical Discourse focuses on the challenges of developing mathematics literacy among California’s diverse student population and developing strategies for teachers that cultivate and advance positive attitudes and critical thinking among their students in mathematics. The course is designed to attend to the specialized vocabulary embedded within mathematics and build understanding of effective pedagogical practices that enable teachers to facilitate meaningful discourse about mathematics as well as encourage and maintain the engagement of all learners while addressing the Mathematics Practice Standards. Content also includes how to analyze K-Algebra One/Integrated One students’ questions, how to develop questions that promote critical thinking and strategies that maintain high levels of cognitive demand throughout mathematics lessons.

    MIAA330 Mathematics Assessment (1)

    Understanding what K-Algebra One/Integrate One students know about mathematics and the implications to instruction is the focus of the course, Mathematics Assessment. A variety of assessment types are explored and developed with particular attention to error analysis, learning trajectories, language assessments, formative and summative (site-based and California Common Core State Standards based) assessments. All discussions and assignments surrounding the varied assessments include the implications to instruction and how to help students use their results to improve their own understanding of mathematics. Teachers work together to determine what K-Algebra One/Integrated One students’ demonstrations of understanding, fluency, or proficiency in mathematics look like and what type of assessment(s) are appropriate. Included in the coursework are techniques for communicating progress to parents, colleagues, and other appropriate service providers. This course prepares students for the course, Equity in Mathematics: Intervention, Accommodation and Differentiation.

    MIAA340 Equity in Mathematics: Intervention, Accommodation, and Differentiation (2)

    Building directly from the information in the course, Mathematics Assessment, the expectations of the coursework in Equity in Mathematics: Intervention, Accommodation and Differentiation require that the results of K-Algebra One/Integrated One students’ assessments inform MIAA candidates’ evaluation, modification, design and implementation of interventions, accommodations and differentiation based on the California Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. MIAA teacher teams will design and implement targeted instruction appropriate for each grade span that promotes all students’ equitable access to learn high-level mathematics.

    MIAA350 Mathematics Instruction: Content, Representations, and Theories (3)

    Implications to instruction based on the rigorous skills, concepts, and ways of thinking that are essential to students’ success and engagement in doing mathematics provide the framework for Mathematics Instruction: Content, Representations, and Theories. The coursework is meant to increase the mathematical understanding of both the MIAA candidate and K-Algebra One/Integrated One students. Maintaining the collaborative philosophy of the program, participating teachers are challenged to ensure that everyone in their class has a shared understanding of what the mathematics means as well as the proper sequencing and scaffolding of the content. This course prepares MIAA candidates for the capstone course, Designing Mathematics Instruction.

    MIAA360/370 Designing Mathematics Instruction and Fieldwork (5)

    With attention to the California Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and building on the knowledge gained within the previous courses, the MIAA candidates collaborate with peers (pre-service, novice, and experienced) through co-planning of instructional units and co-teaching to improve student learning. Participants learn to design effective mathematics lessons for each grade span (K - Algebra One/Integrated One) and to plan and implement lessons specified within their units of mathematics content/instruction. All planning attends to the mathematics content as well as the developmental and cultural needs of the diverse student population of California. The MIAA candidate’s demonstration of their ability to address the complex interplay of mathematics content and pedagogy for effective teaching for each grade span is the purpose of their capstone project.

    SPED221 Exceptional Learners I: Differentiation in the Classroom (1)

    This course introduces candidates to a wide variety of commonly occurring disabilities, etiologies, and historical and educational implications. Candidates learn the process of referring students for testing, and how to set up and facilitate a Student Study Team with appropriate school/district personnel. Also addressed are various types of multi-tiered interventions, programs, and strategies available for teachers to implement with students to create a positive and inclusive learning environment.

    SPED230 Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (2)

    Candidates focus on developing instructional strategies for teaching integrated lessons in the areas of history/social studies, science, and art for all students. Utilizing the California Frameworks and CA state adopted standards, candidates are introduced to the concept of universal access and the use of intervention strategies that are necessary for instructional success. There will be a strong emphasis on how to provide ongoing assistance and collaboration with general education teachers.

    SPED233 Language Arts & Writing Curriculum & Instruction (1)

    Candidates focus on theoretical and practical aspects of teaching reading, writing, speaking, and listening to all students. A variety of strategies, instructional approaches and assessment procedures will be emphasized to ensure the candidate’s ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and regularly assess student progress in a high-quality reading and writing program. Particular attention is paid to small class settings and meeting the needs of culturally, linguistically, and intellectually diverse students.

    SPED251 Diverse Learners with Disabilities (1)

    This course introduces candidates to the common characteristics, varying abilities, and disabilities of a diverse student population. The intern candidate will examine communication development and discuss intervention strategies for both primary and second language learners. Candidates will closely examine characteristics of low and high incidence disabilities in order to secure resources and develop appropriate intervention strategies that promote student progress. Expected ranges of developmental milestones will be reviewed in conjunction with disabilities. Differences in culture, ethnicity, and socio-economic status of exceptional learners will be explored in order to apply principles of equity in educational practices and family relationships. Candidates will receive support in their role as the teacher of record by sharing successes and challenges with the instructor and their cohort colleagues.

    SPED258 Communication & Behavior for Autism Spectrum Disorders (2)

    Candidates focus on students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who manifest atypical development of language, socialization, and sensory processing, resulting in significant communication and behavioral differences. Candidates consider the relationship between communication and behavior and its impact on social access and academic progress. Candidates investigate academic environments and strategies that address the communication and behavioral needs of students with ASD.

    SPED259 Programming Strategies for Students with Autism (2)

    Candidates are presented research-based approaches to teaching students with Autism, as well as, effective strategies currently approved and used in practice. These may include Applied Behavior Analysis, Discrete Trial Training, Pivotal Response Training, Structured Teaching, and Direct Instruction. Candidates focus on visual strategies, picture exchange communication, and social stories. Candidates discuss and apply available assessment tools and data collection procedures as they relate to the development and implementation of lesson plans through the use of effective research-based teaching strategies.

    SPED260 Positive Behavior Management (2)

    This course provides candidates specific strategies for creating and maintaining a positive and supportive learning environment for students with mild/moderate and moderate/severe disabilities. Exploration of proactive interventions to prevent discipline issues will be incorporated throughout the course including various positive behavioral supports. Development of effective Classroom Management Plans and Behavioral Support Plans, individualized to meet each student’s needs will be stressed. Behavior interventions based upon person-centered values and developed in a collaborative, assessment-based process, incorporating positive and effective interventions, will be incorporated targeting the student’s behavioral deficits.

    SPED261 Assessment of Learning and Teaching (2)

    This course provides candidates with the knowledge of basic principles and strategies related to using and communicating the results of a variety of assessment and evaluation approaches appropriate for general and special education students with mild/moderate or moderate/severe disabilities. A variety of non-biased standardized techniques, instruments and processes that are functional, curriculum-referenced, performance-based, and appropriate to the diverse needs of individual students will be examined. Candidates will become familiar with authentic and standardized tools used to assess the developmental, academic, behavioral, social, communication, vocational, and community life skill needs of students. Candidates will be able to make educational and programming decisions based on their assessment results. Candidates will also gain knowledge related to sharing assessment results in a fashion that is meaningful to fellow teachers and your students’ families.

    SPED262 Typical & Atypical Development (2)

    Candidates examine developmental theories and investigate research methodologies as well as risk factors that can influence a child’s developmental competencies. Candidates focus on typical and atypical developmental patterns of children due to prenatal, perinatal and early childhood developmental risk factors. Candidates explore interventions in a range of community settings that address the unique needs of these children and their families and Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSP’s). Early identification and intervention is covered as well as examining a variety of settings serving children with disabilities and their families.

    SPED264 Collaboration Skills (2)

    The purpose of this course is to provide basic communication skills for developing and maintaining interpersonal relationships that serve as a basis for effective collaboration and teaming, particularly in a special education setting. Candidates understand that collaboration helps educators develop interventions for complex student needs with the expertise of all necessary individuals and information required to develop the individualized program for each unique learner. Candidates describe the need for collaboration, define, characterize, and create a framework for successful collaboration. Candidates also explore common barriers to and successful components of successful collaboration including role clarity, interdependence, vision-driven solutions, and a focus on child and families as full partners in systems of care. The practical application of these skills in the candidate’s classroom is supported and evaluated with the Practicum.

    SPED266 History & Philosophy of Special Education (1)

    Candidates review the history of education, including early childhood education and the philosophies adopted as a basis for subsequent models for schooling in the United States. Candidates examine public school in the U.S. from its early beginning, when schools were maintained for religious purposes, up to the diverse schools of today. Candidates explore the historical and political influences on special education policies and practice, including early childhood special education. Candidates examine the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 and Section 504. Professional, legal, and ethical obligations of teaching are examined. Candidates weave together theory and their own field experience to explore these issues as they pertain to a variety of special education settings.

    SPED267 Autism Spectrum Disorders (1)

    The course will provide you with a basic understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and teaching strategies. We will cover the major developmental delays and deficits that are common with Autism, including academics, social skills, and communication. You will be presented with research-based approaches to teaching students with Autism, as well as, known effective strategies, currently approved and used by teachers in the field. These will include positive behavior management, Discrete Trial Training, visual systems, social stories, PECs, TEACHH, Direct Instruction, schedules, assessment, and data collection. Candidates will have the opportunity to develop lesson plans and materials using these strategies and practice putting them to use in class. Additionally, this class will provide excellent resources for further education and knowledge in the field of Autism.

    SPED270 Curriculum & Instruction for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities (2)

    Candidates are presented instructional models, methods, and materials for students with moderate/severe disabilities. General education curriculum scope and sequence are explored. Candidates address techniques for developing programs across academic, life skills, community, vocational, social, and cognitive domains. Emphasis is on the use of adaptations and instruction that provide access to the core curricula, accommodate individual student learning needs and meet IFSP/IEP goals.

    SPED271 Specialized Health, Movement, Mobility, & Sensory Development (2)

    The purpose of this course is to provide candidates with an understanding of the effects of student health and safety on learning. Candidates will become familiar with laws and regulations pertinent to health associated with mild to moderate settings. The examination of practices and safeguards that promote a healthy environment will be a focus. This includes becoming familiar with medications, demonstrating effective implementation of district rules regarding medication, and documenting procedures. Candidates will apply skills for communicating and working constructively with families and community members regarding health issues. Candidates will write and implement IEPs. Support Supervisors observe course content in practice to ensure that a fluid connection exists between coursework and practice.

    SPED272 Assessment & Intervention (2)

    This course provides candidates with the knowledge of basic principles, processes, procedures, and instruments that lead to appropriate interventions and well-developed Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs), and Individual Education Plans (IEPs), and reflect an understanding of the range of appropriate assessment and evaluation approaches available for children from birth through five years of age, including English Language Learners. A variety of non-biased standardized techniques, instruments, and processes will be examined, including the Desired Results Developmental Profile (DRDP). Developmental assessments that measure motor, cognitive, language and speech, social/ emotional, and self-help skills will be administered in the child’s native language. Each candidate will demonstrate an understanding of the IFSP/IEP process and the ability to participate with the family and other members of the team in the development and implementation of an IFSP/IEP and the coordination of services including families with English as a second language. Support Supervisors observe course content in practice to ensure that a fluid connection exists between coursework and practice.

    SPED273 Curriculum & Environments in Early Childhood Special Education (2)

    This course is designed for candidates to apply early childhood developmentally appropriate research and strategies to design and implement curriculum and learning environments that address each child’s specific, disability-based learning need. The course covers curriculum and environments that focus on cognitive skills; language and literacy; motor skills; social/emotional growth; and, communication skills. Candidates will work to increase their ability to create learning environments in a wide range of settings such as homes, child care and development settings, and other community environments. Each candidate will apply a broad repertoire of validated intervention strategies, adaptations, and assistive technologies that minimize the effects of the child’s disability and maximize the child’s learning potential. Particular attention will be paid to small class settings and meeting the diverse needs of children and families culturally, as well as, linguistically. A variety of strategies, instructional approaches, and assessment procedures will be emphasized in order to ensure the candidate’s ability to develop, deliver, integrate, and regularly assess the child’s progress.

    SPED274 Early Language & Communication (2)

    Candidates focus on identifying and treating communication and language disorders in young children up to five years. Foundations for communication learning skills, receptive language skills, pragmatic and expressive language skills, and speech skills in the young are addressed. Presented are specific hierarchies of development, language strategies/techniques, and examples. Candidates learn typical language development, as well as strategies to facilitate functional communication and provide meaningful language lessons to students with special needs. Candidates learn how to meet the communication and language needs of English Language Learners and students with disabilities.

    SPED276 Special Education Law, IEP’s & Transitions (2)

    This course is designed to prepare candidates to understand the legal and ethical responsibilities for serving students with disabilities required by federal and California state mandates. Candidates will develop an understanding of the history and function of special education law. Landmark case laws and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) will be analyzed and studied. Candidates will understand the legal components of the Individual Education Programs (IEP) and Individualized Family Service Programs (IFSP) to effectively create and design individualized programs for their students. Further analysis of case law, federal and state mandates, and local policies will aid in the development of Individualized Transition Plans (ITP), Behavior Intervention Plans (BIP) and individualized measurable, observable, goals and objectives. Candidates will know how and when to access site-based and community-based resources and agencies to support and participate in the IEP/IFSP process as needed. Candidates will understand and identify roles and responsibilities of IEP/IFSP team members (students, families, special and general educators, related service providers, community agencies, etc.).

    SPED281, 282, 283, 284 Support Supervision: Education Specialists (1, 2, 3, 4)

    Candidates work 1:1 with a Support Supervisor and learn how to meld course content into their teaching practice. Candidates’ growth and progress is measured in meeting the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). Candidates receive formative and summative feedback which guides a reflective learning process and which is documented on the Individual Learning Plan and/or supervisory notes. Support Supervisors facilitate this course based on each candidate’s developmental level and needs.

    SPED282A Practicum/Field Work (1)

    Along with their Master Teachers, Residents learn how to meld course content into their teaching practice. Candidates’ growth and progress is measures in meeting the Teaching Performance Expectations (TPEs). Candidates receive formative and summative feedback which guides a reflective learning process.

    SPED289 Support Supervision-ECSEAA (1)

    Candidates work 1:1 with a Support Supervisor and learn how to meld course content into their teaching practice. Candidates’ growth and progress is measured in meeting the California Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). Candidates receive formative and summative feedback, which guides a reflective learning process. Support Supervisors facilitate this course based on each candidate’s developmental level and needs.

    SPED310 Advanced Topics in Special Education (2)

    This course provides an in-depth understanding in positive behavior supports and data collection, collaboration, and application of special education law, including the most recent rulings surrounding case law. The focus of this class will be to critically analyze data reports, personality profiles for collaborating, design research-based strategies for positive behavior support, and identify key legal aspects of special education which affect students with special needs in the classroom.

    SPED312 Specialized Disorders of Students with Special Needs (3)

    This course provides a deeper understanding of the variety of mental, physical, communication, and health disorders affecting students with special needs. Some examples include, but are not limited to: anxiety, apraxia, autism, bipolar depression, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis, seizures, and spina bifida. The focus of this class will be to research the complexity of these disorders and develop curriculum and / or strategies for working with students with these specialized needs and collaborating with others who are a part of their IEP team.

    SPED343a 21st Century Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Special Needs (3)

    conventional teaching strategies within the Mild Moderate special education setting to best practices appropriate for 21st century learning in a Mild Moderate and Moderate Severe special education environments. Course content includes how integrated curricular units are aligned to core content and how to develop units of instruction that are relevant for the students with Mild to Moderate and Moderate to Severe disabilities. Candidates will address techniques for developing programs across academic, life skills, community, vocational, social, and cognitive domains. Emphasis is on the use of: adaptations and instruction that provide access to the core curricula; accommodations to individual student learning needs; and, addressing IFSP/ IEP goals that can be embedded in lesson and unit designs. Intervention strategies are studied, rehearsed, and implemented so that candidates are able to reflect on their instruction and improve their work with Moderate to Severe students. A strong emphasis throughout coursework includes how to provide ongoing assistance and collaboration with general education teachers.

    SPED343b 21st Century Curriculum and Instruction for Students with Special Needs (3)

    This course provides opportunities for candidates to deepen understanding of how to transition from conventional teaching strategies within the Moderate Severe special education setting to best practices appropriate for 21st century learning in a Mild Moderate and Moderate Severe special education environments. Course content includes how integrated curricular units are aligned to core content and how to develop units of instruction that are relevant for the students with Mild to Moderate and Moderate to Severe disabilities. Candidates will address techniques for developing programs across academic, life skills, community, vocational, social, and cognitive domains. Emphasis is on the use of: adaptations and instruction that provide access to the core curricula; accommodations to individual student learning needs; and, addressing IFSP/ IEP goals that can be embedded in lesson and unit designs. Intervention strategies are studied, rehearsed, and implemented so that candidates are able to reflect on their instruction and improve their work with Mild to Moderate students. A strong emphasis throughout coursework includes how to provide ongoing assistance and collaboration with general education teachers.

    SPED385 Masters Project in Special Education (4)

    This is the capstone course for the Master’s degree. As such, candidates will work with their advisor to design and execute a project that demonstrates inquiry, incorporates content from coursework, contributes to the body of knowledge for their focus topic, and makes a real world difference to school, kids, and/or community. The project must be suitable for publication and presentation.

    SPED385b Masters Project in Special Education for Residents (3)

    This is the capstone course for the Master’s degree. As such, residents will work with their advisor to design and execute an action research project that demonstrates inquiry, incorporates content from coursework, contributes to the body of knowledge for their focus topic, and makes a real world difference to school, kids, and/or community. The project must be suitable for publication and presentation.

    STEM310 Introduction to STEM (2)

    This course provides an overview of the attributes of the powerful learning environment provided in an integrated STEM classroom. Candidates experience true integration of topics from science, technology, engineering and mathematics taught in a purposeful, meaningful manner. Emphasis will be placed on shifting paradigms and practice regarding ‘failure’ and reflecting on what practices inspire students to engage in learning. The topics covered in this introductory course also include designing strategies for developing new pedagogies and making curricular connections to real-world situations.

    STEM320 Research in the STEM Classroom (3)

    Research in the STEM Classroom prepares teachers to deepen their understanding of research and develop strategies for implementing student-directed research as part of their curriculum. Instruction in each stage of research and how to communicate results through effective writing comprise a substantial portion of the coursework.

    STEM331 Technology and Tools for the 21st Century Learner (3)

    The course takes a wide lens on computer science by covering topics such as programming, physical computing, and data. Students are empowered to create authentic artifacts and engage with Computer Science as a medium for creativity, communication, problem solving, and fun. How to use technology and tools to advance learning, collaboration, creativity, data management, and problem solving in a STEM setting comprise most of the coursework. Infusion of the techniques and ideas learned in this course is expected within the subsequent STEM courses.

    STEM343 Curriculum for Developing Environmental Literacy (3)

    Educators learn to develop and assess integrated curricula and learning opportunities that nurture PK-12 students' understanding of the natural world outside the classroom and expand critical thinking skills. Beginning with local challenges in the environment, candidates create units that connect human and environmental systems. The units focus on enhancing learning outside the classroom, they are tied to Environmental Principles and Concepts, National Wildlife Federation Pathways to Sustainable Development, and/or UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals, and they integrate the history of local land use.

    STEM344 Lesson Study Environmental Principles and Concepts (2)

    The purpose of this course is to build knowledge and expertise related to the theory and components of effective lesson design. Educators work with peers to co-design, teach, and reflect upon an integrated lesson designed to address Environmental Principles and Concepts, National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Pathways to Sustainable Development, and/or the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Sustainable Development Goals.

    STEM351 Environmental Phenomenology (3)

    Place-based investigations to discover and model local environmental phenomena provide opportunities to build capacity and non-deficit thinking. The Environmental Principles and Concepts (EPCs) are introduced and used to help design inquiry-based activities that take students outside the classroom. Useful community and everyday resources are identified which enhance the quality of environmental education, with emphasis placed on opportunities to participate in community science and impact local and global environments.

    STEM352 Creative Risk-Taking and Design in STEM (3)

    The development of integrated STEM experiences that utilize Design Thinking to solve real-world challenges aligned with the UNESCO Sustainable Development Goals provide the foundation for this course. Implementation of a sequence of lessons provide opportunities to observe PK - 12 students as they move from engaged to empowered problem solvers.

    STEM360 STEM LAB (4)

    The STEM Lab is a 21st century learning space that is designed to advance students’ knowledge of varied content within the STEM disciplines and challenge them to design, plan, and build their personal innovations within a STEM framework. Examples of some topics in the course include coding, robotics, App design, gaming, and virtual reality. Students will learn to use state of the art technology in the SJCOE FabLab. Students will also explore and develop understanding of current advancements in biotechnology.

    STEM370 History: Environmental and Human Impacts (3)

    This course highlights the active role nature has played in influencing human affairs, underscores the impacts humans have had on the environment over time, and examines people's shifting views of nature. Environmental Principles and Concepts (EPCs) and the K-12 California History and Social Science framework inform the study of the relationship between humans and the natural environment.

    STEM375 Actions for Change: Environmental Solutions (3)

    "They wanted to bury us, but they didn't know that we were seeds" Mexican Proverb.

    Development of engaged citizens prepared to navigate and influence the local, national, and global landscape is the purpose of this course. Candidates will be challenged to learn how to engage their PK-12 students to act collectively for shared outcomes, analyze and use social media to examine science with a social justice perspective, and understand the impacts of individual beliefs about land. Educators learn to use Design Thinking with their PK-12 students as they engage with their community to create solutions to local environmental concerns. PK-12 students' Environmental Literacy is fostered as they wrestle with questions such as: How do we assess the health of the environment? What is the capacity of our natural systems? How might we adjust to pollution?

    STEM380 Building Capacity for Sustainability (3)

    "It's amazing what you can get done if you don't care who gets the credit." - H. Truman

    Organizational and systems theories that identify structures needed for sustainability of initiatives within school districts provide a focus for this course. Students build a Plan of Action that addresses leadership strategies for rollout, establishes community support, includes strategies for dealing with local, state, and national political stressors, identifies grant opportunities, builds capacity throughout the district, and develops a shared vision statement. Ensuring that PK-12 students have access to equitable learning focused on local, relevant and actionable environmental concerns requires teachers who are empowered with resources, supported to take learning outside, and have access to local partnerships.

    STEM385 Masters Project in STEM

    Students will work with their STEM or Environmental Literacy advisor to design and execute a project that demonstrates inquiry, incorporates content from the STEM coursework, contributes to the body of knowledge for their focus topic, and makes a real world difference to school, students, and/or community. Project must be suitable for publication and presentation.

    TECH110 Technology for the Classroom (1)

    In this course, teachers will be introduced to various technology tools, applications, and resources, as well as, best practices for integrating technology into the classroom. The course emphasizes hands on technology training designed to assist teachers in their role as a classroom instructor and is designed to meet the introduction level of the technology mastery in accordance with the California Standards of the Teaching Profession. Sessions have been designed to incorporate technology use in conjunction with CA state adopted standards in K-12, English Language Acquisition, and Special Education classrooms.

    TECH280 Technology for School Administrators (1)

    In this course, administrative candidates will be introduced to various technology tools, applications, and resources as well as best practices for integrating technology into schools. The focus of the class will be to guide administrative candidates in using technology as a resource for school use and introduce administrative candidates to using technology as a management and communication tool.

    TECH290 Technology in the Classroom (1)

    In this course, teachers will be introduced to various technology tools, applications, and resources, as well as, best practices for integrating technology into the classroom. The course emphasizes hands on technology training designed to assist teachers in their role as a classroom instructor and is designed to meet the advanced level of technology mastery in accordance with the California Standards of the Teaching Profession. Sessions have been designed to incorporate technology use in conjunction with CA state adopted standards in K-12, English language acquisition, and Special Education classrooms.